As Moana continues to reign, I’m enjoying every hot ticket in town I can buy….

Pintail Foundation, LynnAlaimalo, AigaSeries, SamoanWriters

 

I watched Moana four times already, and still can’t get enough of the dialogues, songs and story.  My daughter have always grown to appreciate her roots, and the movie is an addition to her pride about being a young Polynesian girl.

So what do I think of this famous Moana movie that has topped Box Office consecutively? One word: AWESOME with the heart-ful O!

Moana is an awesome synopsis with a historic sightseeing of a known past of “who we are” as Polynesian people and who our ancestors were as navigators who read swells and stars, and talented in storytelling. I’m sure there was an aha moment on the captures of indigenous people who survived the oceans and lands for many years.

A set of stones placed by chiefs of the past and Moana’s pink conk shell depicted a significant view of a young, curious female conquering her voyages and later becoming a female chief – something rare in our culture if we go back in years. There are taboos in titles. A female holding a chief title was one. Although she claimed that she was not a princess, Moana still upholds a unique undistinguishable title like that of Elsa’s. Elsa of Norway as the only Disney queen, and now Moana, the matchless, brave female chief with a shell-adorned tuiga (crown only a chief’s daughter wears in Samoa) who believed in the call of the ocean, her ancestors and grandmother.

I love how the characters conveniently posit features and norms of the Polynesian people, that while there were some heated communications before its release about the features of the demigod Maui, the villagers resembled the beauty and posture of the Pasifika people, the importance of preservations and their quality of respect for culture and nature. Tehiti (sp? Tefiti) or the island that turned into a curse or volcano to me is a resemblance of our rising oceans and the climate effects which continues to threaten our islands! It’s a great movie to reverse a message back to the world that global warming is alive and well in the Pacific.

My child loves the ocean. For the long run, I reminded her the importance of water in our lives. Seventy percent of Earth is water, and 97% of the oceans that we fathom fishing and navigating in as Polynesians holds all of Earth’s body of water entirely.

My favorite character was not Maui or Moana, but the person who resembled the groove of a Polynesian islander like the little boy doing the boogey while Moana was conducting a dance lesson among the children.  On a more serious note, the crazy island lady, Moana’s grandmother, is my most favorite character on the entire movie – who exhibited all the qualities and values of upbringing, culture, ancestors and the sacred relationship between young people and elders.

I enjoyed watching Moana, and all the beautiful reminders it brought to always defy the odds as wayfinders while never forgetting who we are.

Fa’afetai Disney! Way to Go Seiuli! Way to go Tevaka! Way to go Auali’i!!

Featured Image: Disney